Home Movie News Things Get Stranger Than Fiction In Gemma Bovery
Things Get Stranger Than Fiction In Gemma Bovery

Things Get Stranger Than Fiction In Gemma Bovery

0
0

In Gemma Bovery, Gustave Flaubert’s classic work is given new light, and a great deal of comedic timing in a fresh and contemporary take that audiences will adore.

Inspired by Flaubert’s masterpiece Madame Bovery, Gemma Bovery is a modern and charming romantic comedy that follows Martin (Fabrice Luchini), an ex-Parisian and well-heeled hipster who is passionate about Gustave Flaubert, who has just settled into a quaint Norman village as a baker. He soon meets an English couple, Gemma and Charles Bovery (Gemma Arterton, Jason Flemyng), and he is taken by the similarities that they share with the characters of Flaubert’s greatest work.

The Perfect Couple 

While Gemma’s relationship with her husband Charles is stressed at the best of time, the relationship that she forms with French baker Martin sets the stage for a sweet, and at times, voyeuristic look into the lines that blur between art and reality. Both the gorgeous Gemma Arterton, and the thoroughly inquisitive and curious Fabrice Luchini are at the top of their game here with portrayals that are honest and completely in keeping with their respective characters. Arterton effortlessly captures the role of a woman whose life is slowing, becoming the fiction that interests Martin so much. They’re a formidable and interesting pair to watch up on screen, and their chemistry as acquaintances, who have more of interest in one another than was first thought, will keep audiences guessing.

Art And Imitation 

While French classicist Gustave Flaubert might have provided the inspiration with his work Madame Bovary, it’s Posy Simmonds graphic novel which provided the inspiration for director Anne Fontaine here. While Fontaine certainly captures the high passion and eroticism of Flaubert’s original work, it is a far more comical, and light hearted affair as Martin’s ever imaginative mind gets the better of him. While Fontaine still captures the tragedy of Madame Bovary, her control over comedy, and unexpected laughs, keep Gemma Bovery fresh, making for a very entertaining watch.